When to call a vet

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Why you're as important as the vet to your cat's health

You know your cat better than anyone else and, if you're at all concerned, you shouldn't hesitate to pick up the phone to your vet. It's always better to be safe than sorry and no vet will mind a false alarm.

When to call the vet

Call your vet if you notice any of the following:

  • Loss of appetite

  • Vomiting

  • Diarrhoea or constipation

  • Coughing, wheezing or difficulty breathing

  • Bleeding

  • Limping

  • Dirty eyes or ears

  • Lethargy, tiredness or less active

  • Excessive scratching or very red skin

  • Increased thirst

  • Difficulty passing urine

  • Crying in pain or mewing

  • Swollen legs or joints

  • Anything else that worries you.

The last of these is important.

Saistītie raksti

  • Meeting The Housemates

    If you already have a cat at home, she's likely to become territorial when your new kitten arrives.
  • Vaccinating your kitten

    Your new kitten will start life with some natural immunity from diseases from her mum, but as this wears off you'll need to have her vaccinated to keep her healthy.
  • Travelling with your kitten

    Creating an enriched environment for your senior cat can increase activity and mental stimulation, and reduces potential behavior problems.
  • Microchipping

    Your kitten shouldn't be allowed outside the home until she's completed her first course of vaccinations.

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